Water’s Edge Kimono

Water's edge kimono in Caron yarn in the color ocean. kimono on hangerWater’s Edge Kimono

Hey there!

I’d like to believe that Spring is here since we’ve passed the daylight savings time clock change, but it just so happens to be snowing right now. Hopefully, wherever you are, the weather is warmer.

Even though it’s cold today, I designed this beautiful Water’s Edge Kimono in the hopes that Spring would hurry up. I think sometimes Mother Nature needs a good swift kick in the pants! Ha! I’m only fooling myself though. She’ll do whatever she wants.

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UPDATE!!! The starting chains for the two front panels have been updated to create a more consistent neck hole size. (April 9, 2018)

Water's edge kimono in Caron yarn in the color ocean. kimono on manequinI love the different Kimono patterns that I’ve been seeing from other designers. Simple construction, generous sizing, seasonally appropriate — I needed to design one! The lacy pattern makes it perfect for Spring, Summer and Fall…maybe even Winter, for those of you who live someplace warm. (Totally jealous…)

A video tutorial is now available for the stitch pattern. Click here to see my very first video!

Water's edge kimono in Caron yarn in the color ocean. kimono on woman standing on a bridge in front of a lakeYou can wear a long sleeved blouse or top underneath when the weather is mild or a tank top when it’s a bit warmer. The Water’s Edge Kimono is a very versatile layering piece that is perfect for your wardrobe.

This kimono is simple in its construction. There are three panels that are seamed together using a tapestry needle and yarn. Trim is then added around the armholes and the main body opening to finish it off.

Water's edge kimono in Caron yarn in the color ocean. kimono on mannequin back viewI chose Caron Simply Soft yarn in the color Ocean. I tend to use Caron quite often for making clothing simply because it is lighter than worsted weight and much softer on your skin. They also have so many colors to choose from, which is great! (I’m not an affiliate for Caron. I just like their yarn. 🙂 )

I originally found the stitch pattern on Pinterest. (The chart on the bottom of the pin) It was only a chart and none of the words were in English, so I set to work figuring it out. Fortunately, it wasn’t nearly as difficult as it appeared. I’ve created a step-by-step photo stitch tutorial to go along with this pattern for your convenience. You can see the step-by-step photo stitch tutorial here.

close up of stitches

Water's edge kimono in Caron yarn in the color ocean. kimono on mannequinThis Water’s Edge Kimono pattern is designed to be long, but if you’re in doubt about the length for your own sweater, I suggest holding the panel up to the shoulder seam of whatever shirt you are wearing. That way, you can determine the length you need to fit you the way you desire. Be sure to adjust all panels to the same number of rows.

If you want an Extra Small or any size higher than a 3XL, you will need to subtract or add 6 chains. For instance, the number of chains needed for the back panel of a Small are 100, so for an Extra Small, you would need 94 chains. For a 4XL, add 6 to the 3XL number of chains (130) to get 136. Remember to do this for all three panels.

You can customize this kimono any way you want! Get creative!

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Add this project to your Ravelry queue here at this link.

What is your favorite yarn to make clothing with? Let me know in the comments below!

I also designed a super easy poncho pattern if you’d like to take a look. Click here.

So, let’s get started!

Water’s Edge Kimono

Materials Used:

Skill Level:

Intermediate

Gauge:

16 double crochet stitches and 7 rows in a 4” (10cm) square.

Special Stitches:

You can see the step-by-step photo stitch tutorial here.

You can see the video stitch tutorial here.

Modified Cluster Stitch #1

Ch 3, YO and insert hook into the side of the single crochet you just made, YO and draw back through the stitch, YO and draw through 2 loops. YO and insert hook back into the side of the sc, YO and draw back through the stitch, YO and draw through 2 loops. YO and draw through all 3 loops on hook.

Modified Cluster Stitch #2

Ch 4, YO and insert hook into the first chain of the chain 4 you just made, YO and draw back through the stitch, YO and draw through 2 loops. YO and insert hook back into the side of the sc, YO and draw back through the stitch, YO and draw through 2 loops. YO and draw through all 3 loops on hook.

Abbreviations:

FC – foundation chain (beginning chain)
YO – yarn over
ch – chain
st(s) – stitch(es)
sc – single crochet
dc – double crochet
tc – triple (treble) crochet
sl st – slip stitch

Notes:

  • This pattern is designed to be over-sized and super roomy. Since the kimono is over-sized, I made mine one size larger than the size I am. I’m a XL and I made a 2XL.
  • This stitch pattern is a multiple of 6 chs + 4, if you would like to use this stitch combination for any other project or to create a size kimono that is not given.
  • This kimono is constructed of 3 rectangular panels that are seamed together. A border is added around the sleeves and main body of the kimono.
  • Instructions are given for how many chains are needed for each cluster stitch. After the number of chains (3 or 4), it will say “complete cluster” since it is the same instructions for both kinds of cluster stitches. See Special Stitches section.
  • For the first modified cluster stitch that uses an initial chain 3, the rest of the cluster stitch will be worked into the side of the single crochet that the chain comes out of. You can see the step-by-step photo stitch tutorial of the Water’s Edge Kimono here.
  • You can see the video stitch tutorial here.
  • The clusters are referred to as petals in the instructions since they look like petals of a flower. One cluster is one petal.
  • You can block your panels if desired. The example is not blocked.
  • Sizing is written as Small with Medium, Large, XL, 2XL, 3XL written in parenthesis. For example, the FC for the back panel is size S-100 chs (M-106, L-112, XL-118, 2XL-124, 3XL-130) It helps to mark your size numbers before you begin to avoid confusion.

*** American crochet terms used throughout.

Instructions:

Back Panel

Make 1 using H hook

FC: Ch 100 (106, 112, 118, 124, 130)

Row 1: In 5th ch from hook, dc. Dc in each ch across. Turn. (97, 103, 109, 115, 121, 127 dc)

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), skip the st the ch 4 comes out of and skip the next st, *dc in next st, ch 1, skip 1 st* Repeat from * to * across. In top of ch 4 turning ch, dc. Turn.

Row 3: Ch 3 (counts as dc). *In ch-1 space, dc. Dc in next st,* Repeat from * to *. Dc in the ch-4 space. In the third ch of the ch 4 from previous row, dc. Turn. (97, 103, 109, 115, 121, 127 dc)

Row 4: Ch 1, sc in same st ch-1 comes out of, *ch 3, complete cluster in the side of the sc, skip 2 sts, dc in next st, ch 4, complete cluster in the first ch of the ch 4, skip 2 sts, sc in next st* Repeat from * to *. The last sc of the row is worked into the top of the ch 3 turning chain. Turn.

Row 5: Ch 8. In the 5th ch from hook, complete cluster. Sc in dc from previous row, ch 3, complete cluster in the side of the sc. *Ch 4, complete cluster in the first ch of the ch 4, skip 2 petals, sc in dc from previous row, ch 3, complete cluster in the side of the sc.* Repeat from * to *. Tc in 1st sc made of previous row. Turn.

Row 6: Ch 1, sc in same ch 1 space, ch 2, dc in sc between petals, ch 2 *sc in between next set of petals, ch 2, dc in sc between petals, ch 2* Repeat * to *. Sc in 4th turning ch of previous row. Turn.

Row 7: Ch 3 (counts as dc), 2 dc in ch-2 sp *dc in next st, 2 dc in ch-2 sp* Repeat from * to *. Dc in sc from previous row. Turn.

Repeat Row 2 – Row 7 for pattern.

Final Row
                            39
M                             45
                            45
XL                            51
2XL                          51
3XL                          51 (If this isn’t long enough, add another Row 2 – Row 7.)

Finish off. Weave in ends.

Approximate Size of Back Panel

                             25”W x 22.5”L
                            26.5”W x 26” L
                             28”W x 26”L
XL                             29.5”W x 29.5”L
2XL                           31”W x 29.5”L
3XL                           32.5”W x 29.5”L

Side Panels

Make 2 using H hook

FC: Ch 46 (46, 52, 52, 58, 58)

Row 1: In 5th ch from hook, dc. Dc in each ch across. Turn. (43, 43, 49, 49, 55, 55 dc)

Row 2: Ch 4 (counts as dc + ch 1), skip the st the ch 4 comes out of and skip the next st, *dc in next st, ch 1, skip 1 st* Repeat from * to * across. In top of ch 4 turning ch, dc. Turn.

Row 3: Ch 3 (counts as dc). *In ch-1 space, dc. Dc in next st,* Repeat from * to *. Dc in the ch-4 space. In the third ch of the ch 4 from previous row, dc. Turn. (43, 43, 49, 49, 55, 55 dc)

Row 4: Ch 1, sc in same st ch-1 comes out of, *ch 3, complete cluster in the side of the sc, skip 2 sts, dc in next st, ch 4, complete cluster in the first ch of the ch 4, skip 2 sts, sc in next st* Repeat from * to *. The last sc of the row is worked into the top of the ch 3 turning chain. Turn.

Row 5: Ch 8. In the 5th ch from hook, complete cluster. Sc in dc from previous row, ch 3, complete cluster in the side of the sc. *Ch 4, complete cluster in the first ch of the ch 4, skip 2 petals, sc in dc from previous row, ch 3, complete cluster in the side of the sc.* Repeat from * to *. Tc in 1st sc made of previous row. Turn.

Row 6: Ch 1, sc in same ch 1 space, ch 2, dc in sc between petals, ch 2 *sc in between next set of petals, ch 2, dc in sc between petals, ch 2* Repeat * to *. Sc in 4th turning ch of previous row. Turn.

Row 7: Ch 3 (counts as dc), 2 dc in ch-2 sp *dc in next st, 2 dc in next ch-2 sp* Repeat from * to *. Dc in sc from previous row. Turn.

Repeat Row 2 – Row 7 for pattern.

Finish off. Weave in ends.

Final Row
                             39
M                              45
L                               45
XL                             51
2XL                           51
3XL                           51 (If this isn’t long enough, add another Row 2 – Row 7.)

Approximate Size of one Side Panel

S                               10”W x 22.5”L
M                              10”W x 26” L
L                              12”W x 26”L
XL                            12”W x 29.5”L
2XL                          13.5”W x 29.5”L
3XL                          13.5”W x 29.5”L

Assembly

Lay your large back panel on a flat surface. Place your side panels as shown in the photo below, matching up ends. You can use stitch markers or pins to hold everything in place if you wish. Using a tapestry needle and your yarn, begin stitching the panels together along the orange lines. The two short lines on the top are the shoulders. The two lines along the sides are just below the armpits. Use the chart below to determine the inches needed for the armholes.

photo shows panels laid out flat and orange lines indicate where to seam

Armholes

                       Inches from Shoulder
S                                   6”
                                8”
L                                   8”
XL                                10”
2XL                              10”
3XL                              10-12”

Trim

Using J hook

Round 1: Attach your yarn in any stitch along the arm hole. With the right side of the cardigan facing you, begin single crocheting evenly around the armhole opening. Sl st in the first sc made of round.

Round 2 – Round 5: Ch 1, sc in every sc around. Sl st in 1st sc made of round.

Repeat Rounds 1 – 5 for the second armhole.

Trim for the body opening of the Water’s Edge Kimono

Round 1: Still using the J hook and with the right side of the kimono facing you, attach the yarn in any stitch and sc. Begin single crocheting evenly around the entire opening – along the rough side of the front panel, along the hemline, up the other rough edge of the 2nd front panel and across the back of the neckline. There are two corners and they are at the base of the 2 narrow front panels. When you come to the corners, (sc, ch 2, sc) all in the same corner space. Sl st in the first sc made of the round.

Round 2 – Round 5: Ch 1, sc in every sc around. In both ch-2 spaces that are corners, (sc, ch 2, sc) in the ch-2 space. Sl st in 1st sc made of round.

Finish off. Weave in ends.

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I hope you’ve enjoyed the Water’s Edge Kimono pattern! If you make one and would like to show off your work, you can tag me on Instagram using @highlandhickorydesigns. I can’t wait to see your kimonos!!!

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46 thoughts on “Water’s Edge Kimono

  1. I needed a nice coverup for summer, this looks like it will work, hopefully it doesn’t take me all summer to make! Lovely pattern, a challenge to an old afghan maker.

    1. Thank you! I’m so excited that you like the design. I didn’t think to use it as a cover up, but now that you mention it, that would absolutely work! Thank you for stopping by and commenting! I hope it doesn’t take you all summer to finish it.

  2. Love the cardigan and I would love to make it. But I can’t make the link to the diagram work :(. Is the link still good or can you send me an e-mail?
    Thank you, Marlous

    1. Hello Marlous! I’m so excited to hear that you love the cardigan design! I tried the link and it still works to get to the pin, but once you click on the pin, it doesn’t go to a source. It is just a photo. So here is the link to the pin, which will show you the diagram — the pattern is the one on the bottom of the pin. https://www.pinterest.com/pin/328833210286560154/ Let me know if this doesn’t work for you. Maybe I can screenshot it with my phone and send you an email. Thank you! Erica

  3. Is there also a dutch version of this pattern.I love the Kimono, but in English I don’t really know which stitches are the stitches in Dutcn.

    1. Hello! I’m sorry to say that right now my patterns are only in English. But I can tell you that there are some people around the internet who will translate a pattern for you for a small fee. A lady contacted me not too long ago to ask if it were okay for her to translate one of my patterns for a customer. So they are out there. Maybe a Google search would help you find a translator. I’m sorry I’m not able to do it for you. Good luck! Erica

  4. I’ve been wanting to try making one of these but I can only get hold of fingering weight yarn. I don’t like using big hooks as well cause I don’t like the loopy look of it. I’m glad you put the measurements and the multiples for the starting chain so at least I can try and make one using the yarn I have ☺️👍🏼

    1. Hi! Yes, you can definitely customize it using the measurements and the multiple for the starting chain! I’d love to see what it would look like when done with a smaller hook and yarn. If you’d like to share your work, I’d be so excited to see it. I imagine that it is going to be beautiful. Thank you for commenting and I hope you have a great day!

  5. Thank you SO much for creating the video! I’m not sure that I would have figured out which stitches to make the clusters into without the visual.

    1. You’re so welcome, Vicky! I’m so glad that the video was helpful! Thank you for stopping by my blog and letting me know. You’ve given me the confidence to make more videos for other patterns! Thank you!

  6. This is one of the loveliest kimono’s I’ve seen yet! And thank you for the clarifications in the comments! You do beautiful work. I signed up for the newsletter and look forward to seeing more.

    1. You’re welcome for the clarifications and thank you for signing up for the newsletter and your sweet words! I really appreciate it! Thanks for commenting.

  7. This question is cross-posted on Ravelry, because I wasn’t sure which one you would respond to more quickly.

    This is gorgeous, but I wince at the thought of working in such a long foundation chain! Could I do the foundation as foundation single crochet rather than simple chains? I ask since the trim calls for single crochets anyway. I’ve found FSC to be stretchier than regular foundation chains, which makes blocking easier. Thanks!

    1. Hi! Oh yes, you can definitely use the FSC if you are more comfortable with that. Thank you for commenting!

  8. I really like this, but I prefer working from charts (it’s a dyslexia thing.) Can you provide the link to the pin that had the stitch pattern?

    1. You’re so very welcome, Marianne! I really appreciate your kind words and I hope that I can keep sharing my patterns with you all for many years to come! 🙂 Thank you for your support and have a great day!
      Erica

    1. Hi Kelly! I guess I should have mentioned that you should sew it with the right sides facing and then flip it right side out once you’re finished. Thank you for pointing that out. 🙂

  9. This pattern looks lovely, but I’m hoping for some clarification. Is it correct that the size small has a back panel width of 97 stitches, with each side panel being 31 stitches wide (for a total of 62 stitches), leaving a front/neck opening 35 stitches wide, but the size 3X has a back panel width of 127 stitches, with each side panel being 61 stitches wide, for a total of 122 inches, leaving only a 5-stitch wide front/neck opening?

    1. Hello! Thank you so much for liking the pattern! 🙂 I wanted to also thank you for bringing this issue to my attention because I hadn’t noticed on my own. You are right. The neck openings on the different sizes were all completely different. While I still think that if a kimono was made using these original measurements, you’d still end up with a lovely kimono (I checked what a 35 stitch opening and a 5 stitch opening looked like — large difference, but wouldn’t ruin the pattern since there is also a border), I do feel that I need to make some corrections to the widths of the front panels to make the neck opening more consistent. So I’m going to be making those corrections immediately. Others have finished their kimonos already and love them so I’m hoping this change doesn’t affect too many people who have already received their pattern. Thank you again and I hope you decide to make the kimono!

        1. You’re so welcome! If you have any questions, please let me know. I’m here to help! Thanks again!

  10. Thanks for sharing the pattern! I love the unstructured design combined with the intricate stitch pattern! Would this work using a DK-weight yarn. I’m in Hawaii so a lighter-weight yarn would work better.

    1. Hi Patrice! Hawaii! I’m so jealous! Ha! Okay, since DK weight yarn is a size 3 yarn and I used medium weight yarn (size 4) for the example, you can definitely use the size 3 yarn for your Kimono. But one thing that I would watch for is the sizing. I would recommend using the size hook the yarn package suggests and your panels might be slightly smaller than the measurements given. So, depending on what size you are making and if you prefer a looser or more form fitting kimono, I would take the size difference into account. You could even make a swatch of double crochets and see how it compares to my gauge listing. If it is a lot smaller than my gauge, I would size up the kimono. I hope this helps! Thanks!

  11. Your Kimono looks fabuloues. Love it. As I like it more to work with a chart, could you add this or send it to me. Thank you.

  12. Hi! It’s a beautiful work! I wanted to do it but I’m not surr if to do it as a M or an L. I’m actually small, but my hips are bright… what do you think? Thank you!!!

    1. Hi Mijal!

      I think that if you are actually a small, and if you want a kimono that is more form fitting, I would go with a Small . If you want it a little looser fitting, I would only go up one size to the Medium. If you want to talk about this further and discuss measurements, just send me an email at highlandhickorydesigns dot com. Have a great day!

  13. Soooo beautiful,my fav color & yarn, you just move me to desire start making one right away. Tank you very much for share your ability

  14. This is a GORGEOUS pattern and the loveliest one I have seen so far.
    Always captivated by floral motifs too. Very detailed pattern will be most helpful. Many thanks.

    1. You’re so welcome! I’m so thrilled that you like it! You’ve definitely inspired me to make more floral patterns.

  15. The kimono is beautiful! My favorite yarn is I Love This Yarn. Would I have to make any changes if using this yarn?

    1. Oh, I Love This Yarn! is one of my favorites too! They have amazing colors and it’s so soft. Anyway, I Googled it just to make sure, but I Love This Yarn is also a size 4 medium weight yarn. So you’re good to go! Thank you, Pat!

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